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Join the conversation! There are now 6 comments on “Convict Yourself pg 113
  1. Andrew M. Farrell says

    Oh jeese. Moment of silence for that bank guard. I’ve got a feeling he was dealing with a bunch of issues beforehand and that shooting was the ingot that broke the camel’s back.

  2. Jon says

    Aaaaand, looking back, the guy invoked his rights, didn’t he.

    • He specifically said, “I’m not answering any questions, and I want a lawyer [emphasis in original].” That’s about as clear an invocation as one could imagine. Much clearer, certainly, than in Smith v. Illinois, 469 U.S. 91 (1984), where Smith said “Yeah, I’d like to do that,” in response to the officer asking if he understood that he had the right to consult with a lawyer, and the Court there held that that was sufficient to invoke and that the police had to stop all interrogation at that point.

  3. Ann Onymous says

    R.I.P. Frank :,(

    Hearing his death mentioned casually out of the blue makes it even more unsettling.
    Also, the poor teller. :(

  4. Ann Onymous says

    Also, there *has* to be a better way to round up criminals than a sting operation that results in a guard killing a baby and himself.
    If I was one of the people who organized the sting with Jack, I’d be feeling awfully guilty for both deaths.
    At least Bahr seemed regretful when he learned of the child’s death. I’m glad he’s got *that* much humanity in him, at least.

  5. Ann Onymous says

    Also, the nobody would be charged with the guard’s death, even though it was (indirectly) caused by the crime, because it was a suicide, right? Or would this get into cause in fact, proximate cause, etc.?

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