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Join the conversation! There are now 5 comments on “Entrapment pg 27
  1. WJS says

    You would think they would have explained how it works to him a bit better. But of course, someone has to do it wrong or we wouldn’t have an example.

  2. Jason Ostergaard says

    I am struggling to see the difference between Francine’s case and Grayson’s case. Although Grayson did not initially refuse, was he not corrupted by the police (in the form of a bribe), which caused him to commit a crime that he otherwise would not have? Grayson was not going to commit the crime on his own, and would not have committed it for the police if had they not bribed him. What if the police had offered him $1 million, or $1 billion? Few people (especially members of Grayson’s economic class) would initially refuse such lucrative opportunity, even if they would have never done it on their own.

    • Yeah, I’d like to see this explanation. Another case I had read was this young man offering this young woman on the street a box of salad since she looked “raggedy”. It was a good gesture of offering someone food. But the woman offered sex in return. Although initally confused, the man complied, and that’s when the cops arrested him.

    • The difference really just boils down how much persuasion occurs. If Grayson had said “no, you know I’m not in that business” and the cop had responded with something like “do it or I’ll tell the kingpin you snubbed us” that’d almost definitely be entrapment. Basically, anything that would make a “reasonable” person commit the crime counts.

      As for the “enormous amounts of money” hypothetical, I pointed this out in an earlier comment, but I would expect most people (not even “reasonable” people, but most people period) to be extremely suspicious of anyone purporting to be handing out millions to a stranger for *any* reason. I wouldn’t accept a deal to deliver drugs for millions even if they showed me the cash up front, because I would fully expect it to be collected off my corpse after the completion of the delivery.

      Which is why police never actually offer anyone $1 million or whatever. The point of sting operations is to fool career criminals, which offering insanely off-base payouts is never going to do.

  3. Yeah, I’d like to see this explanation. Another case I had read was this young man offering this young woman on the street a box of salad since she looked “raggedy”. It was a good gesture of offering someone food. But the woman offered sex in return. Although initally confused, the man complied, and that’s when the cops arrested him.

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